Brexit: A Response from the UK by Richard Collins

In response to my blog about Brexit, Richard Collins sent me the following, originally as a personal email message. Since Richard does not have a blog, I’ve asked and received his permission to post his thoughts here:

“I am surprised by the result, it is momentous and intimidating. But, in fact, I voted for Brexit – as the least worst of unattractive alternatives. Briefly, economics points to remain; politics to leave (EU contempt for popular sovereignty, obsession with further integration, inability to retreat from mistakes notably the euro etc). But I am not excited: it will be very tough for years.

In the days immediately after the result, the sabre rattling by Juncker, Schultz etc made staying in look even less attractive – punish the UK so no-one else leaves. Their vision of a Europe bound together by fear is deeply unattractive. Merkel is being very sensible. Geography will not change. We remain neighbours and need, as she says, a co-operative and constructive relationship. I agree. Once the anger and hurt subside there will be time for sensible – difficult – negotiation. Cameron etc is right to insist on a delay. The weekend felt a bit too much like August 1914 where hasty decisions and angry rhetoric risked getting everyone into a position they would rather not be in.

My wife, originally from Finland, was pro remain and is upset by the result fearing anti-foreigner sentiment. I hope and believe she has nothing to worry about. But there have been some unpleasant anti-foreigner insults. A striking instance is that at the Polish cultural and social centre, POSK, in west London where some idiots awarded it anti-Polish graffiti. This elicited a flurry of good wishes, flowers etc, from sympathetic locals and a solidarity eat in on our part (ie, we went there for dinner – no hardship since the food is both good and good value). The offence to the Poles is particularly unwelcome since Poles made so signal a contribution to fighting Nazism alongside Britain and other allies. If ever there is a group who has earned a place in UK society it’s the Poles. More history lessons required for graffitist idiots.

Flowers and Notes received by POSK following "Poles go Home" Graffiti
Flowers and Notes received by POSK following “Poles Go Home” Graffiti

I think the Brexit decision is one from which both sides will lose. Some parts of the EU more than the UK (the financial crises in Greece, Spain and Portugal have been intensified post Brexit referendum far more than the financial pain the UK has experienced). However, I think after five – admittedly very difficult – years there is a very good chance we will be fine (depending on trade negotiations with other economies – including the EU). I am not so confident about the Eurozone. And Scotland will not find it easy to join the EU after any proximate separation from the rest of the UK (Spain will block admission fearing that Catalonia will follow). So it’s a great pity to leave – the EU has made possible notable achievements as well as the failings which stimulated more than 50% of UK voters to say “no more” – but I think the least worst thing for the UK. We will see how the EU adapts.”

Richard Collins

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s